Alec Hogg
All over the world, companies are discovering that serving stakeholders rather than shareholders is the new business of business. Many in South Africa are ahead of the curve. Operating below the radar and without seeking fanfare, thousands of companies have for years already been quietly doing their bit. A special lot, my countrymen.
— Alec Hogg

Alec Hogg is an old friend, a one-time neighbour and a renowned financial journalist. The venue for his and Jeanette’s weekend sojourn was right here at Summerhill (Hartford House) where we were celebrating the nuptials of a former senior member of our team. Alec knows our district well, and he doesn’t need any educating on the needs of our land. These were his, as usual, positive observations:

“Over the weekend we travelled to KZN for the wedding of dear friends and to meet some new ones. In getting-to-know-you conversations I was struck by how many South African businessmen, almost instinctively, are doing the right thing.

In passing, I discovered how one couple feed and fund a school for 300 HIV/Aids orphans. How another stays in South Africa although his three siblings have emigrated to Australia – primarily because he can make a difference here. A business founder who employs 100, he maintains labour intensive processes that keep people in jobs, even though streamlining would generate higher profit. Yet another has recently expanded an already substantial programme that sends previously disadvantaged employees abroad for skills development.

All over the world, companies are discovering that serving stakeholders rather than shareholders is the new business of business. Many in South Africa are ahead of the curve. Operating below the radar and without seeking fanfare, thousands of companies have for years already been quietly doing their bit. A special lot, my countrymen.”

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